COVID-19: We are all in this together

Wir alle sind von der Pandemie betroffen und spüren ihre Auswirkungen in unserem Alltag. Unser Leben hat sich verändert und wir müssen uns an die neuen Gegebenheiten anpassen. Wir haben Studierende und junge Leute aus der ganzen Welt befragt und sie haben uns erzählt, welche Auswirkungen das Coronavirus auf ihr Land und ihr Leben hat. 

Von Doushka Makoona, Magdalena Schäufl & Sophie Skeisgerski.

Joanna, Polen 

Joanna, Polen

Hi, I am Joanna, 24 years old, from Poland.

How is the current situation with the pandemic in your country at the moment? What are the measures that have been taken?

The number of cases is still increasing, as said we’re still before the peak of the pandemic. In the middle of March, universities, schools, and establishments such as libraries, museums, and so on were closed. Additionally the shopping centers, cinemas were also closed. But now our government decided to ease the measures.

How do you find these measures? Are they effective in your opinion?

They’d be effective if they lasted longer. If they’re going to open everything now, it won’t end up well.

How has your life been affected by the virus? What are the challenges for you and your biggest concerns? 

I had to go back to my home city, I left all of my belongings at dorm which I have no access to right now. I’m finishing my masters this year and it’s been difficult to focus on writing my thesis. Also there is still no info yet specified on the thesis defense which stresses me out.

What are you looking forward to do once the pandemic is over?

I just want to meet up with my friends, go for a nice dinner in the city, just not worry about every time I go out. Also, I’d like to go on a trip somewhere.

What do you think that we can learn from this crisis? 

That our plans and dreams are nothing when it comes to something that doesn’t depend on us. We do not cherish such simple things as being able to go out for shopping or seeing our friends.

Camilla Gori, Italien

Camilla Gori, Italien

My name is Camilla, I’m 25 years old and I am an Italian Media and Communication student at the University of Passau. 

How is the current situation with the pandemic in your country at the moment? What are the measures that have been taken?

Italy was strongly hit by the Coronavirus with about 32.000 deaths and 227.000 infections confirmed. On the 8th of March the Italian Prime Minister Conte announced the introduction of the imminent lockdown. We Italians love to go out and have fun, we love to be with family and friends all the time. We could not believe that was happening. It was allowed to go outside only to go grocery shopping (only one member of the family) or for other very important reasons. At the very beginning we were still allowed to go running outside, then that was also forbidden. We felt like in prison. People have never experienced anything like this before, we are so jealous of our freedom and a lot of us did not understand the gravity of the situation and how important it was (it is) to follow the rules. The state is with us, not against us. Unfortunately, a lot of Italians are allergic to rules, and this caused even more infections (people would still meet and do whatever they wanted). From the beginning of the lockdown till now, there have been 115.738 complaints about violations of Article 650 of the Criminal Code (“non-compliance with Authority measures”) and 61.029 for administrative violations. Now that the “fase uno” (first phase) is over and the second one started, people are still not behaving properly. They got most of their freedom back and use it to go to parties and make up for everything they couldn’t do until now. What’s the point? why did we sacrifice ourselves when people just throw it all away like that? From the 3rd of June it will be possible to circulate without certifications throughout Italy and this could result in a new relapse (if people do not behave responsibly).

How do you find these measures? Are they effective in your opinion?

Italy was the first to close everything, making a strong decision for the safety of people (unlike other countries) and it makes us proud. We sacrificed our already precarious economy to save lives. The very hard restrictions were necessary, the state had to make a decision and of course, it is not possible to make everyone happy. But health comes always first, in fact, if there hadn’t been these rules, a lot more people would have lost their lives (even young people).

How has your life been affected by the virus? What are the challenges for you and your biggest concerns? 

The quarantine was also an opportunity to spend some precious time with loved ones, so for me, it was very nice (unfortunately many people were left alone and suffered a lot). The thing that worries me the most is our already weak economy, now completely on its knees. Many people do not work and if they work, they earn very little. It will take a long time to get out of this terrifying crisis. Besides, the virus may return, perhaps even more aggressive and at that point, we will not be ready to face it again.

At the moment the restrictions are much reduced; we can go out without having to justify why and we are free to move within our region. From the 3rd of June, we can travel all over Italy without a valid explanation (for now only for important reasons of work). In my situation, I don’t feel very affected by the restrictions, even before, during phase one, I was very busy with the university and this helped me to get distracted.

What are you looking forward to do once the pandemic is over?

Honestly, the only thing I miss right now is my friends. It’ll be great to hug them again when all of this is over.

What do you think that we can learn from this crisis? 

The first consideration is fear leads one to reflect on the precariousness of health and life, on the temporariness of certainties and acquired goods, on the reality or possibility of one’s mortality or that of loved ones or others. Being introspective is a healthy occasion in a time characterized by an excess of attention to exteriority or by the race to accumulate material securities. Secondly, fear is positively reflected in the call for unity and cooperation. Mutual and shared sensibility and responsibility contribute to the reconciliation of family and social ties at a critical moment in the history of the country. Also, fear that does not paralyze but vitalizes can be transformed into creativity in the use of leisure time, in giving innovative answers to the limits, and restrictions imposed by the emergency, in cultivating art as an antidote to boredom, in enjoying a good film, in living with gratitude cultural/leisure stimuli and much more. Many people have dedicated themselves to passions and hobbies that they usually couldn’t cultivate because of the limited time available during the day.

Lucia Marin, New York, USA

Lucia Marin, New York, USA

How is the current situation with the pandemic in your country at the moment? What are the measures that have been taken?

This response is mainly my personal experience on the matter as I decided not to follow or read most of what the media was providing in regards of Covid-19. The current situation regarding the pandemic is one that should lead to caution. The United States of America (USA) as a whole is too much to cover, but I know from reading a few articles in the Atlantic and the New York Times that there are several states such as Florida, Arizona, and Texas to name a few, with spikes of the virus. Fortunately, New York City which was the epicenter for a few months, in the last three weeks approximately, the virus has remained low at under 900 new cases. Yes, it looks like a big number but remember that New York is the most populated city in the USA with over 6 million people, and nearly 9 million people in New York State. Going back to the current situation, everything seems to slowly be getting back to a new normal. People can have small gatherings of 10 people and under. Of course, not everyone follows the rules as they should, but it is safe to say that most people do. Per an article in the New York Times, the high unemployment rates that we experienced in the past month dropped. 

How do you find these measures? Are they effective in your opinion?

Well, I believe that most countries did the same. Stay home as much as possible, unless you were considered an essential worker, or do essential traveling such as grocery shopping. If you were doing any traveling, you had to wear a facemask, and wash your hands regularly.  Many jobs that were able to transition online did so, and many others simply closed. Our train system that used to run 24/7, was shut down at night for 4 hours. I am not sure if it has been resumed to its usual schedule. New York is reopening by phases. Each phase must pass certain guidelines, but the main point seems to be the one about making sure that the number of new cases with the virus does not go up. 

The measures given and taken came from experts on health, so I will not be the one saying if it was right or not. Certainly, these measures brought a lot of new problems for some people; like anxiety, the raise on domestic abuse, more hungry people, among others. I am not sure it could have been done any other way. Time will tell, perhaps Switzerland will prove that they had a better way to do things as opposed to the USA, Germany, France and many others?

How has your life been affected by the virus? What are the challenges for you and your biggest concerns? 

My life has not immediately been affected. I have a great roommate who is barely home because he is an essential worker. I was one lucky person to continue working from home. As a matter of fact, and as selfish as this may sound, this gave me the opportunity to have a very well needed break in terms of always rushing from one place to another. I am an avid exerciser, and so I continue doing just that to maintain my sanity. Cook healthy every day, read more books that I never had time for. Now, will this remain to be my luck for long? No, the are possibilities of losing my current job because of the upcoming budget cuts, but I prefer not to worry about it, this too shall pass. It the meantime, the virus impacted my life, but in a positive way. Of course, I have family members who have small children, and I see how difficult it has been for them. I also know of a few acquaintances who lost their lives due to the virus, and I never want to look insensitive to any of the unfortunate that this virus has represent to most.

What are you looking forward to do once the pandemic is over?

I look forward to somehow vain things such as traveling, being able to exercise in my gym, and being physically able to hang out with friends. In a broader aspect, I look forward to people being able to go back to work, children go back to school and playgrounds. Jobs being available for most, and the list can go on.

What do you think that we can learn from this crisis?

Life is a learning journey. What we can learn is to be more empathetic, and less individualistic. To give a little less importance to a materialistic lifestyle which has shown to be not environmentally friendly, and perhaps for most not even as satisfactory as they would expect to.

Belén, Paraguay

Belén, Paraguay

Hello there! My name is Belén. I am 35 years old and I am from Encarnación, Paraguay. I work as a teacher trainer and an English teacher. I love traveling, reading, going out and teaching and I really miss my students.

How is the current situation with the pandemic in your country at the moment? What are the measures that have been taken?

The lockdown started in March, 10th. The first two weeks complete lockdown. All activities were suspended and it was our last day of class at school. The government started the actions right away after the first positive case in the country. The borders were closed, and self-isolation was mandatory. After the first two weeks, all essential workers went back to work but with extreme measures of selfcare. Restaurants could offer take outs and delivery. Gyms and sport centers were open in June. All social gatherings with over 10 people at homes were (and still are) forbidden.

Washing hands is still mandatory before entering to any store or place (places set a mobile sink outside of their buildings for this purpose. You can find up to 6 sinks in one block), besides wearing a mask at all times while doing groceries or at bank and in open spaces, such as parks and the promenade.

School will remain closed until the end of school year (November) and are providing the lunch food to families. (once a month, families can get a box with rice, oil, flour, sugar, salt, beans, etc.)

How do you find these measures? Are they effective in your opinion?

Most people agree with the measures. I think the government took the best decisions considering our public health systems isn’t really good. We managed to flatten the curve and cases are few. Most of them remain in shelters or isolated at home.

Although, many people are struggling with finances. I think that it worked and we have a sense of security.

How has your life been affected by the virus? What are the challenges for you and your biggest concerns?

My life changed drastically. I used to work at a Teaching center from Monday to Saturday and at an English institute twice a week and I was very social. I haven’t been out since this started, except to take my dog to the vet. 

After a rocky start, classes are 100 percent online and most students are coping well with this methodology. I am concerned about the ones we are leaving out because they don’t have the resources to keep up with their education. Internet access is still an issue here.

I know I am blessed because I don’t have to worry about money or rent, as I am getting paid and I live in my family home. So I can say I am not worried about myself. I do worry about my students and many people in my city, and country, who are struggling financially to keep afloat.

What are you looking forward to do once the pandemic is over?

I am looking forward to go back to my place of work and have mate (traditional Paraguayan beverage, similar to tea) with my coworkers, to see my students again. To be able to visit my family and friends.

I had planned to visit Europe with my sister in July, but it was cancelled. I’m looking forward to make that trip.

What do you think that we can learn from this crisis?

I have learned to be thankful, to cherish the people around me, to take care of expenses. No matter how my job has changed, I am happy I chose something I love, because that really helped to embrace the change and to cope with these uncertain times.

Wei, China

Wei, China

Mein Name ist Wei, ich komme aus Peking und ich studiere derzeit Informatik an der Universität Passau. Ich habe vom 25. Februar bis 27. April Urlaub in China gemacht. Anfangs waren die Einschränkungen nicht streng. Wir wurden gebeten, ein Kontaktformular auszufüllen, einschließlich Flug, Sitznummer, Kontaktnummer und so weiter. Gleichzeitig mussten wir 14 Tage lang isoliert zu Hause bleiben. Bei Betreten oder Verlassen der Community, einem Gebiet, bestehend aus einem oder mehreren Gebäuden mit bis zu Millionen von Einwohnern, muss der Pass überprüft werden. Der Pass ist anonym, es gibt also die Möglichkeit, die Community illegal zu betreten und zu verlassen. Jedoch muss man das Risiko dafür tragen, mit möglicherweise schwerwiegenden Konsequenzen. Es drohen bis zu fünf Jahre Gefängnis. 

Wie ist der Umgang mit Corona in deinem Land? Welche Maßnahmen sind getroffen worden?

Die Beschränkungen sind seit März strenger geworden. Man kann nicht mehr von allen Städten aus nach China einreisen. Von Deutschland nach China kann man beispielsweise nur von Frankfurt nach Shanghai einreisen. Eine medizinische Untersuchung in einem Krankenhaus in Shanghai ist neben einer 14-tägigen Isolation in einem speziellen Hotel verpflichtend. Dafür muss man etwa. 1500 Euro bezahlen. Danach muss man weiterhin 14 Tage zu Hause unter Quarantäne gestellt werden. Das Zimmer wird verschlossen (Gerät zur Alarmierung beim Öffnen der Tür) und es kommt jemand vorbei, um einmal am Tag die Körpertemperatur zu messen. 

Ich habe einen Freund, der das Zimmer über das Fenster verlässt und ein Stück Eisen in die Mitte der Sirene steckt, damit er frei ein- und ausgehen kann. Obwohl es immer mehr Lösungen als Probleme gibt, ist dies dennoch mit einem hohen Risiko verbunden. Nach Ablauf der Quarantäne kann man die Community mit dem Pass legal betreten und verlassen. Beim Betreten von Innenräumen wie Einkaufszentren und Supermärkten herrscht Maskenpflicht und die Körpertemperatur wird gemessen. Ich denke jedoch, dass die Messung der Körpertemperatur eher formell ist, weil die Oberflächentemperatur aufgrund der kalten Temperaturen oft unter 30 Grad Celsius liegt. 

Wie geht es dir mit dieser Belastung und den aktuellen Herausforderungen? Was bereitet dir die größten Sorgen? 

Ich mache mir keine Sorgen wegen der Epidemie. Menschen können sich in der Epidemie entwickeln und eine stärkere Immunität erlangen. Wie Darwins Evolutionstheorie sagt, ist die Epidemie nur ein Screening des Menschen. Ich sehe mehr Möglichkeiten: Zum Beispiel Pharmaunternehmen mit herausragenden Leistungen während der Epidemie, produzierende Unternehmen mit niedrigen Aktienkursen und Unternehmen, die Cloud-Dienste wie Zoom anbieten und so weiter. Ich denke alles hat Vor- und Nachteile. Bevor die Krise eintritt, müssen wir das Risiko der Krise vollständig berücksichtigen. Aber wenn die Krise eingetreten ist, müssen wir nach Möglichkeiten in der Krise suchen. 

Welche Einschränkungen gibt es und wie ist das für dich? Inwieweit wird dein Leben/ Alltag eingeschränkt?

China ist ein Land, das stark auf Online-Shopping und Kurierdienste angewiesen ist, und selbst ältere Menschen über 70 Jahren verwenden meistens Computer oder Handys. Chinas jährliche Expresszustellung macht mehr als 70 Prozent der weltweiten Gesamtmenge aus. Diese Maßnahmen wirken sich also grundsätzlich nicht auf junge Menschen aus. Während dieser zwei Monate in China habe ich jeden Tag ungefähr 10 Pakete erhalten. Der Kurier garantiert, dass die Ware innerhalb von acht Stunden ankommt. Man kann verschiedene Mahlzeiten online bestellen und erhält diese innerhalb von 45 Minuten. Die meisten dieser Dienstleistungen sind kostenlos und man kann zudem auch Einweg-Töpfe und -Öfen erhalten. Der Preis kann niedriger als bei einem Besuch im Restaurant sein. Jedoch ist es nicht möglich, zu Unterhaltungsprogrammen oder -veranstaltungen zu gehen und es gibt weniger Friseurläden.

Für einige Leute, die keine Ersparnisse haben, wird es Schwierigkeiten geben. In China haben viele Menschen keine Versicherung, weil sie dadurch mehr Löhne bekommen. Die Löhne werden in der Regel nach dem Arbeitsaufwand berechnet, und es gibt keinen Mindestlohn. Viele kleine Unternehmen mussten während des Ausbruchs schließen, sodass sie keine Einnahmen hatten. In meiner Familie gibt es dieses Problem nicht, weil meine Eltern beide voll bezahlten Urlaub haben und wir auch Mieteinnahmen haben. Zudem habe ich an der Börse Geld verdient. 

Was können wir, deiner Meinung nach, aus der Krise lernen und mitnehmen?

Für China ist die Krise fast vorbei, aber wir halten immer noch strenge Beschränkungen ein. 

Meiner Meinung nach sollte der Fokus jetzt auf Südamerika und Afrika liegen, da die südliche Hemisphäre kurz vor dem Eintritt in den Winter steht. Südamerika liegt sehr nahe an den USA und hat eine große Bevölkerung. Gleichzeitig sind die Fähigkeiten der Regierung gering und es gibt nicht genügend medizinische Versorgung. Zudem ist Südamerika das weltweit wichtigste Eisenerzproduktionsgebiet. Wenn die Stahlproduktion aufgrund der Epidemie reduziert wird und es zu einem Preisanstieg kommt, wird dies den globalen Rohstoffhandel und die weltweite Rohstoffproduktion erheblich beeinträchtigen.

Die Bedingungen in China unterscheiden sich stark von denen in Deutschland und können nicht immer verglichen werden.

Anita, Wuhan, China

Anita, Wuhan, China

Ich heiße Anita und bin jetzt 22 Jahre alt. Zurzeit befinde ich mich im vierten Studienjahr meines Germanistikstudiums. Meine Uni hat ein Austauschprogramm mit der Uni Passau. In meinem dritten Studienjahr (2018/2019) studierte ich in Passau. Jetzt bin ich zu Hause in Wuhan.

Wie ist der Umgang mit Corona in deinem Land? Welche Maßnahmen sind getroffen worden?

China nimmt das Coronavirus sehr ernst. Dabei steht das Leben der Menschen an wichtigster Stelle, vor der wirtschaftlichen Entwicklung. Am 23. Januar wurde die Stadt Wuhan abgeriegelt, der öffentliche Verkehr wurde eingestellt, fast alle Geschäfte und Schulen wurden geschlossen und Veranstaltungen abgesagt. Binnen eines halben Monats hat Wuhan zwei spezielle Krankenhäuser mit über 2000 Betten fertiggestellt. Alle Verdachtsfälle wurden an festgelegte Orte gebracht.

Danach haben andere Städte ähnliche Einschränkungen verhängt, zwar nicht so streng wie in Wuhan, aber auch mit großen Auswirkungen auf den Alltag. Die meisten Menschen blieben freiwillig zu Hause. Wenn man ausgeht, ist ein Mundschutz verpflichtend. Im Februar schloss das Wohngebiet, in dem mein Zuhause liegt, den Ein- und Ausgang. Das Wohngebiet durfte man nicht mehr verlassen und man konnte nicht mehr einkaufen. Alle bestellten die Lebensmittel online und erhielten die Waren am Eingang des Wohngebiets.

Wie geht es dir mit dieser Belastung und den aktuellen Herausforderungen? Was bereitet dir die größten Sorgen?

Mein Leben ist stark eingeschränkt, ich kann nicht ausgehen und meine Freunde treffen. Ich kann nicht in die Uni gehen, alle Vorlesungen finden online statt. Jeden Tag wasche ich meine Hände mindestens fünf Mal. Besonders störend ist, dass ich nicht im Restaurant essen kann. Das Essen zu Hause ist eintönig und die online bestellten Lebensmittel sind nicht vielfältig. Meistens gibt es Weißkohl, Rettich, Chinakohl und Kartoffeln… Im Großen und Ganzen kann ich aber all das verstehen und akzeptieren.

Wie findest du diese Maßnahmen? Sind sie deiner Meinung nach wirkungsvoll?

Ich finde solche Maßnahmen hart, aber notwendig. Solang es keinen Impfstoff gibt, ist die beste Maßnahme, die Infektionskette zu unterbrechen. Für die eigene Sicherheit und Sicherheit der anderen müssen wir die Einschränkungen in Kauf nehmen. Und für mich ist das Leben während der Abriegelung nicht so langweilig: Kochen, Bücher lesen, TV-Serien anschauen, sich mit der Familie unterhalten sind viele Tipps gegen die Langeweile.

Welche Einschränkungen gibt es und wie ist das für dich? Inwieweit wird dein Leben/ Alltag eingeschränkt?

Während dieser Zeit ist die größte Belastung hauptsächlich auf der mentalen Ebene. Anfangs las ich täglich stundenlang die Nachrichten, sah im Internet schreckliche Szenen aus den Krankenhäusern, die rapid steigenden Infektionsfälle und hörte wie Bekannte meiner Eltern auf einmal starben. Außerdem machten mich die negativen Bewertungen anderer gegenüber der Einwohner Wuhans sehr traurig. Gerade wie Ausländer wegen des Coronavirus Vorurteile gegen Chinesen hatten, hatten Chinesen aus anderen Städten Vorurteile gegen Wuhaner. Wuhanern wurden vorgeworfen, heimlich die Stadt zu verlassen und das Virus in anderen Städten zu verbreiten. Bis auf wenige Ausnahmen blieben die meisten Wuhaner zu Hause. Am Anfang der Pandemie war ich immer besorgt und bedrückt. Jetzt ist die Situation in China unter Kontrolle, die Einschränkungen werden schrittweise gelockert und das Leben kehrt allmählich zurück zur Normalität. Die Abriegelung in Wuhan wurde im April aufgehoben und einige Geschäfte nehmen die Arbeit wieder auf.

Momentan kümmere ich mich mehr um mein Studium und meine Abschlussarbeit. Ich habe zwei wichtige Prüfungen, die eigentlich im März hätten stattfinden sollen und deren Ergebnis ausschlaggebend für die Jobsuche und Bewerbung um einen Studienplatz im Ausland ist. Bis jetzt weiß ich noch nicht, wann wir die Prüfungen ablegen können. Außerdem habe ich weniger Chancen auf ein Praktikum, das ist meine größte Sorge.

Auf was freust du dich nach Corona am meisten? Was willst du zuerst machen?

Ich freue mich auf köstliches Essen im Restaurant und auf Treffen mit meinen Freunden. Wenn es möglich ist, möchte ich auch Reisen machen.

Was können wir, deiner Meinung nach, aus der Krise lernen und mitnehmen?

Wir sollten Wildtiere und die Umwelt schützen. Es ist wichtig, dass wir eigene Verantwortung tragen, selbstständig denken und nicht blind anderen nachlaufen. Wir sollen Informationen einholen und selbst beurteilen, die Regelungen einhalten und im Moment leben.

Christophora Nisyma, Indonesien

Christophora Nisyma, Indonesien

Christophora Nisyma, 22 Jahre alt, Studentin im Fach Medien und Kommunikation (MuK) an der Uni Passau, aus Indonesien. 

Wie wird in deinem Land mit Corona umgegangen? Welche Einschränkungen gibt es und wie ist das für dich? Inwieweit wird dein Leben/ Alltag eingeschränkt? Wie findest du diese Maßnahmen? 

Wie in Deutschland und anderen Staaten sind die Maßnahmen seit Mitte März, wie Home-Office, Kontaktbeschränkungen, Online-Lehre, Ausgangsbeschränkungen, der Mundschutz, willkürliche Schnelltests (zum Beispiel in einigen Bahnhöfe in Jakarta) und Erklärungen der Weltgesundheitsorganisation (WHO), wie man das Virus vermeiden kann, sehr ähnlich. Was vielleicht anders ist, ist die Absage der Staatsexamen aller Abschlussklassen im Jahr 2020. 

Meiner Meinung nach handelt die indonesische Regierung in dieser Krise zu langsam. Die Umsetzung der Maßnahmen ist immer noch nicht klar. Jeder Gouverneur hat selbst entschieden ohne Anweisungen von der zentralen Regierung. Die Einschränkungen sind nicht so streng und eindeutig wie in Deutschland. Leider hat die indonesische Regierung das Coronavirus unterschätzt. Lächerlich ist, dass unser Gesundheitsminister geglaubt hat, dass Covid-19 nicht nach Indonesien gekommen ist, die Indonesier sehr gesund sind und Beten als Mittel gegen Corona ausreicht.

Nach Angabe des indonesischen Außenministeriums hat Indonesien seit dem 18. Januar 2020 angefangen, in allen Flughäfen 135 Fiebermesser aufzustellen. Jedoch wurde mit der Umsetzung dieser Maßnahme erst gegen Mitte/Ende März begonnen. Die sozialen Einschränkungen auf großer Ebene begannen erst ab dem 10. April in Jakarta und in anderen Städten ab dem 23. April. Es setzen nicht alle Regionen beziehungsweise Provinzen auf diese sozialen Einschränkungen. Die Maßnahmen sind echt hart und in Indonesien aufgrund der Kultur und Wirtschaft fast unmöglich. Wir haben mit circa 260 Millionen Einwohnern eine sehr große Bevölkerung und alle sind es gewohnt, sozial und nah beieinander in fast allen Berufsgruppen zu leben. 

Von 23. bis 24. Mai sind die islamischen Feiertage Eid al-Fitr (das Fastenbrechen nach dem Ramadan). 87 Prozent der Bevölkerung sind Muslime und das Heimfahren oder das Zurückkehren in das eigene Dorf ist fast ein Muss und eine jährliche Tradition. Obwohl die Regierung Verbote gegen die Heimfahrt gestellt hat, versuchten viele Menschen heimlich zu fahren. Noch dazu gibt es an dem Feiertag das Festgebet oder ṣalāt al-ʿīd. 

Die Regierung hat dringend empfohlen, dieses Gebet zu Hause oder online zu machen (wie die heilige Woche zu Ostern), weil dieses Gebet in der Regel in den Moscheen und auf öffentlichen Gebetsplätzen mit hunderten bis tausenden Teilnehmern stattfindet. Trotz des Verbots protestierten die Leute und wollten für das Gebet in die Moschee gehen.

Auch auf wirtschaftlicher Eben haben wir Probleme. Bei uns gibt es viele kleine Verkäufer auf traditionellen Märkten und Essensstände an der Straße. Das Leben vom Großteil der Bevölkerung ist abhängig vom täglichen Einkommen. Deswegen sind viele Läden und Restaurants noch nicht geschlossen. Einige Freunde von mir haben sogar heute noch im Restaurant gegessen. Es gibt noch keine Strafe von der Regierung. Nur die Hauptstadt Jakarta wendet eine Strafe an. Wenn alles geschlossen werden müsste, würde das ein großes Problem sein. Sogar jetzt ist es schon wirklich schwierig. Nach Angaben der Nachrichten können sich viele Menschen in Indonesien ihr Essen oder die Miete nicht bezahlen. Einige der großen Firmen haben hunderte Mitarbeiter gefeuert. 

Außer der oben genannten Maßnahmen, gibt es eine einzigartige Initiative von Jugendlichen in einer Gemeinde in Jawa Tengah (deutsch: Zentraljava). Sie haben sich als den traditionellen indonesischen Geist, Pocong, verkleidet. Pocong ist in Indonesien bekannt als die Seele eines Toten, der in seinem Leichentuch gefangen ist. In der islamischen Tradition wird die Leiche in einem weißen Leichentuch begraben, das über dem Kopf, unter den Füßen und am Hals festgebunden ist. Da die Menschen noch wenig Bewusstsein haben, dass sie zu Hause bleiben müssen, hatten die Jugendliche Ideen, die Menschen, die noch draußen unterwegs sind, zu erschrecken. Dieser Geist ist der schaurigste in Indonesien und viele Leute haben Angst vor diesem Geist. 

Wie geht es dir mit dieser Belastung und den aktuellen Herausforderungen? Was bereitet dir die größten Sorgen?

Ich bin eigentlich ganz entspannt. Ich bin der Meinung, dass wir keine Panik brauchen, aber wir müssen vorsichtig sein und uns informieren. Daher finde ich auch die Kontaktbeschränkungen in Ordnung. Die Ausgangsbeschränkungen waren etwas schwierig. Mein Freund wohnt in Augsburg und konnte mich nicht besuchen. Ich bleibe lieber hier in Deutschland als in Indonesien, weil ich mich hier sicherer als in Indonesien fühle. Das deutsche Gesundheitssystem ist viel besser als in Indonesien. Aber persönlich finde ich es schwierig, zu Hause zu lernen. Ich brauche die Atmosphäre an der Uni, wo viele lernen. 

Auf was freust du dich nach Corona am meisten? Was willst du zuerst machen?

Ich freue mich auf die Sommerferien. Ich kann mir einen Sommer ohne Strand oder ohne Reise ins Ausland nicht vorstellen. Im Sommer gehe ich gerne shoppen. Ich habe schon im Kopf, welche Kleidung ich haben möchte. Es ist schwierig, Kleidung ohne Anprobe zu kaufen. 

Was können wir, deiner Meinung nach, aus der Krise lernen und mitnehmen?

Wir begegnen uns mit einer neuen Normalität. Zu Hause bleiben und im Bett liegen kann auch helfen, ohne im Krieg mitzukämpfen.

Juhyun Park, Südkorea

Juhyun Park, Südkorea

Hello! My name is Juhyun Park. I am 23 years old and I’m from South Korea. I am currently attending a bachelor’s course at Sejong University.

How is the current situation with the pandemic in your country at the moment? What are the measures that have been taken?

11.050 confirmed patients, 17.660 examined, 262 dead. This data shows the current situation of Covid-19 in Korea (as of May 17, 2020). The recent incident has caused another negative effect of spreading to secondary, tertiary, and fourth infections after a confirmed case of Covid-19 was released at the Itaewon Club in Seoul on the 6th. However, the majority of club visitors have completed the test, and the spread is easing because there are fewer cases of additional infections. 

Regarding measures that have been taken, the three typical responses and policies are: First, it is a standard operation model of a screening clinic called ‘covid19 drive-thru’. This made it possible for the government to collect large-scale samples in consideration of safety and efficiency to cope with the growing demand for diagnostic tests. The second is to keep a high-intensity social distance. From March 22nd to May 5th, intensive social distance keeping was implemented. Third, there was a controversy over privacy violations, but there was a policy of disclosing the movements of Covid-19 confirmed patients.

How do you find these measures? Are they effective in your opinion?

I think those measures at the time and now have helped both quantitatively and qualitatively to overcome Covid-19. I was especially impressed by the systematic positioning of the drive-through method.

How has your life been affected by the virus? What are the challenges for you and your biggest concerns? 

This Covid-19 incident changed my life a lot, too. Due to this situation, the semester has begun, but the most regrettable thing is that we are not able to give on-site lectures and university life as we are in the middle of a semester of non-face-to-face classes. Also, it took quite a while for me to get used to wearing a mask every time I went out. And the biggest concern about this is the economic crisis. Many companies are struggling financially, and there are many cases of unemployment and a slump in employment.

What are you looking forward to do once the pandemic is over?

No one can predict exactly when this situation will end, but once it calms down, I think I’ll live every day appreciating and cherishing the life before it.

What do you think that we can learn from this crisis? 

I’ve learned that infectious diseases are something that can destroy our daily lives in an instant and that we should be more concerned about responding to these kinds of situations because they are an inevitable negative factor for mankind.

Dildar Ahmed Saqib, Pakistan

Dildar Ahmed Saqib, Pakistan

Dildar Ahmed Saqib, 24 Jahre alt, Masterstudent im Fach Informatik an der Universität Passau.

Wie wird Corona in deinem Land behandelt? Was sind die Einschränkungen und wie sind diese für dich? Inwieweit ist dein Leben / Alltag eingeschränkt? Was hältst du von diesen Maßnahmen?

Nachdem das pakistanische Gesundheitsministerium am 26. Februar die ersten beiden Corona-Fälle des Landes bestätigt hat, begann die Regierung, die notwendigen Maßnahmen zu ergreifen. Fast alle Fälle stammten von den iranischen Grenzen. Aufgrund des unausgeglichenen Zustands des pakistanischen Wirtschaftsstaates dauerte es mehr als einen Monat, um eine vollständige Sperrung durchzusetzen. Anschließend implementierte Inter-Services Intelligence ein „Track & Trace“-System zur Bekämpfung des Virus. Die Regierung stellte außerdem 734 Millionen Pfund (807 Millionen Euro) in bar für die ärmsten 12,5 Millionen Haushalte bereit.

Einer meiner Freunde sagt mir, dass er nicht in seine Heimatstadt reisen kann und mitten im Nirgendwo festsitzt, da es kein Büro, Fitnessstudio, Sport und so weiter gibt, in dem er Aktivitäten ausführen kann. Aber er ist zufrieden mit den Maßnahmen, die die Regierung ergreift.

Wie geht es dir mit dieser Belastung und den aktuellen Herausforderungen? Worüber machst du dir am meisten Sorgen?

Das Coronavirus hat unter anderem die Arbeitslosenquote in verschiedenen Ländern exponentiell erhöht. Darüber hinaus werden arme Länder aufgrund der Wirtschaftskrise ärmer. Nach dem Ende des Virus befürchte ich, dass die Welt nicht mehr dieselbe sein wird wie zuvor, und dass die Menschen sich eher in die Maschinen als in die Menschen verlieben. Wir sind eher von der Maschine als vom Menschen abhängig.

Worauf freust du dich nach Corona am meisten? Was möchtest du zuerst tun?

Natürlich zum Friseur gehen, ein paar Einkäufe machen und vor allem meine Eltern, Familie und Freunde besuchen und eine schöne Zeit haben.

Was können wir deiner Meinung nach aus der Krise lernen und mitnehmen?

Wir sollten proaktiv auf mögliche zukünftige Pandemien reagieren. Diese Pandemie gab uns auch die Lehre, unsere Wirtschaft zu digitalisieren, sonst könnten wir im wirtschaftlichen Wettlauf zurückbleiben.

Ndeye Soukeye Faye, Senegal 

Ndeye Soukeye Faye, Senegal

Mein Name ist Ndeye Soukeye Faye und ich bin 25 Jahre alt. Ich studiere Medien- und Kommunikationswissenschaft und komme aus dem Senegal.

Wie ist der Umgang mit Corona in deinem Land? Welche Maßnahmen sind getroffen worden?

Die Coronakrise kam im März mit 15 Fällen in den Senegal. Einige Wochen später gab es einen Todesfall, der Panik auslöste. Danach wurde der Notstand ausgerufen und die Schließung von Schulen, Universitäten und Gotteshäusern im ganzen Land angeordnet. Es folgte ein Verbot von Versammlungen und eine Ausgangssperre von 20 Uhr bis sechs Uhr morgens. Einen Monat hat sich die Situation zunehmend verschlechtert. Mit mehr als 2000 Coronafällen ist der Ausnahmezustand immer noch in Kraft und die Ausgangssperre geht von 21 Uhr bis fünf Uhr und die Märkte sind nur noch an drei Tagen in der Woche geöffnet.

Wie findest du diese Maßnahmen? Sind sie deiner Meinung nach wirkungsvoll?

Ich denke, es ist zum Wohle aller, dass der Staat diese Entscheidungen getroffen hat. Wenn er diese Initiative nicht ergriffen hätte, würden wir mit Tausenden von Fällen überhäuft werden. Es ist wahr, dass die Armen in dieser Situation am meisten davon betroffen sind, ihre Familien täglich zu versorgen. Daher bezweifle ich die Wirksamkeit dieses Verfahrens.

Wie geht es dir mit dieser Belastung und den aktuellen Herausforderungen? Was bereitet dir die größten Sorgen?

Nun, angesichts dieser Situation haben wir keine andere Wahl, als die Regeln zu befolgen. Was die Arbeit betrifft, so ist es nur die Routine, zu Hause zu bleiben. Ich gehe nur aus, um einzukaufen oder zu arbeiten, ansonsten bleibe ich zu Hause. Und zum Glück muss ich noch Hausaufgaben machen, sonst wäre es langweilig.

Welche Einschränkungen gibt es und wie ist das für dich? Inwieweit wird dein Leben/ Alltag eingeschränkt?

Wegen der Ausgangssperre gehe ich nachts nicht aus, aber das Problem ist, dass es keine Besuche und auch keine Klassentreffen gibt. Die Tage sind lang…

Auf was freust du dich nach Corona am meisten? Was willst du zuerst machen?

Ich freue mich auf das Reisen, meine Freunde zu treffen und meine Familie zu besuchen. Und viele Dinge zu genießen.

Was können wir, deiner Meinung nach, aus der Krise lernen und mitnehmen?

Einerseits weiß ich, dass nichts wertvoller ist, als die Familie. Ich würde alles dafür geben, sie wiederzusehen.
Und auf der anderen Seite ist es die Wirtschaft. Wir können die Ausgangssperre nicht aufrechterhalten, insbesondere Entwicklungsländer wie Senegal nicht. Wir müssen also zunächst an unsere Gesundheit denken und dann dem Staat helfen, uns vor dieser Krankheit zu schützen, also die Präventivmaßnahmen zu respektieren.

Belinda Beasley, Australien

Belinda Beasley, Australien

Hi, my name is Belinda Beasley. I am 35 years old and I live in Queensland, Australia. I am an early childhood educator. I am currently studying my Bachelor of Early Childhood Teaching.

How is the current situation with the pandemic in your country at the moment? What are the measures that have been taken?

Australia is managing Covid-19 as well as can be expected. Measures that have been taken including social distancing, limit on social gatherings, cancelation of sporting events. Shops that have remained open have had to adhere to strict policies, such as a limit placed on the amount of customers that can enter the premises. Places of worship, swimming pools, cinemas, cultural events, beauty salons and gyms have also been forced into closure. This includes all non-essential businesses. Restaurants and cafes could remain open, however only if they provide take-away services. All dine-in services are prohibited. All international flights are banned, and domestic flights are limited. State borders are also closed. We were also instructed to self-isolate if we had travelled internationally or had come into contact with someone who had as a preventive measure. A major emphasis is placed on the importance of personal hygiene, washing hands regularly and using hand sanitiser. Workplaces that remained open during the crisis also had to adhere to strict policies and guidelines. In my workplace, educators and children were required to have their temperature checked upon arrival.

It didn’t take long for panic mode to set in. This saw essential items disappear quickly from the supermarket shelves. This caused a limit to be placed on certain items. A limit of one item per person was in place in all supermarkets for the following: Pasta, Rice, Frozen Veggies, Toilet paper. 

The Australian government also put into place a jobkeeper and jobseeker scheme. This was to support businesses and employees financially during the peak of the crisis. This was in place for 16 weeks. Our government also allowed us to withdraw from our superannuation fund without any penalties. In our country for every full-time and part-time employee, employers have to pay a percentage of their wage into a superannuation fund. This is a retirement fund. Due to the pandemic, the government announced that an amount of up to $10.000 can be released early to those in financial crisis.

We are now slowly going back to ‘normal’ and a lot of the restrictions have been lifted. For example, restaurants, places of worship and some sporting events are continuing, however there are still strict guidelines in place to allow for this. While Queensland and most of Australia is seeing a dramatic decline with the pandemic, Victoria and New South Wales are seeing an increase. Victoria is currently in major lockdown, especially Melbourne metropolitan area. Strict measures are still in place for this state as cases continue to spike. We are seeing images on the news of cries for help as people are struggling to access basic services. 

How do you find these measures? Are they effective in your opinion?

The measures taken have proved as effective as they can be. It comes down to individuals. If everyone took preventive measures in the first place, and fully understood the significance of the pandemic crisis, it would’ve changed the amount of cases we have seen and lessened the impact on our society.

How has your life been affected by the virus? What are the challenges for you? What are your biggest concerns?

In the beginning, the unknown was frightening. My biggest concern was the amount of people not taking it seriously. Other concerns are the long-term effect this will have on our economy. Australia is quite isolated from the rest of the world. This can be both a blessing and a curse. We import a lot of products and rely on these. Because of the pandemic, this has caused massive amounts of delays. Seeing Victoria in its current state of crisis is evident that Australia is still in the midst of it. Mental health is a cause of concern, as well as access to vital services. Being cut off from these can have dire consequences to one’s wellness and wellbeing. Especially for the vulnerable and elderly. For me, spending time with family and friends is something that I took for granted. Not having the option of spending quality time together was definitely a challenge. I often catch up with friends throughout the week, especially on the weekends. This would include seeing a movie, going out for dinner or simply hanging out. This all came to a halt.

I am categorised as an essential worker, however my hours did get cut. My workplace was eligible for the government jobkeeper scheme, which allowed my employer to keep us all employed. Even though I lost hours, I was still thankful to have a source of income to sustain me. The degree I’m studying is through correspondence with the university, so again, I’m thankful that this hasn’t interfered with my studies.

What are you looking forward to do once the pandemic is over?

Travelling! Seeing the world get back on its feet. Going to the beach. Seeing a movie! Appreciating the little things more.

What do you think we can learn from this crisis?

Not to take things for granted! Having money isn’t everything! When the supermarket shelves were becoming bare, having money was almost pointless. If there is anything good to come out of this, I feel like it slowed everyone down, forcing families into spending time together and showing us what really matters. It definitely is the little things.

Beitragsbild und alle weiteren Bilder: Unsplash.